Is This Abstract...

 

Everyday, I go through a process of evaluating new perfumes and working as an olfactive mediator to establish a common language between my perfumers and clients… converting feelings that are so abstract into a medium that is already abstract by nature. And over the years I have come to know that perfumery is the most abstract of arts. A Pollock for example, you are left to find your own meaning and aesthetic value. And although an artist like Pollock is not concerned with defining the intention of his work (attending almost exclusively to appearance) there are still elements that you can decode through sight and touch. You have the scale of the painting, sometimes a frame creating the borders, you perceive the colors and identify the movement and the textures, and then you have context of space where the piece is being exhibited. However, the experience of scent presents a more challenging puzzle. There are no visual representation outside of the person that is wearing the fragrance. Sometimes you may experience a trace of a perfume and not even know who the owner is, nor at which point this scent is being diffused. In this sense I would say it is even more abstract than a Pollock. But would you call it abstract art?

 
 
 
 
 
Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock

 
Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko

 
 
 
Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky

 
Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

 
 
Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler

 
 
Gavin Sorhaindo